Guest Editorial


Grandma Shoots Back, Stops Two Attackers, Lives

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alan korwinWASHINGTON, D.C.--The second in a series of news stories about innocent people shooting criminals appeared in USA Today Monday morning, as a paid advertorial, in the Wash., D.C.-regional edition.

The First-Responders Report ™ featured the story of a person, shot four times by two vicious thugs, who was able to return fire with a legally carried .45 caliber pistol. The black woman – a grandmother and healthcare worker – was returning home from a double shift when the incident took place. She says the gun saved her life.

What is remarkable about the incident is that it took eight shots to stop the two assailants. Charles Schumer, the NY state senator who campaigns for greater limits on the civil right to arms, helped pass a law that makes it a crime to have a gun with more than seven rounds of ammunition. This woman would have been a criminal if she had saved her life under Schumer's law (and possibly dead if she didn't have that last life-saving shot). The heroic crime survivor lives in Detroit.

Congress and the Beltway audience are shielded from such news, because mainstream media suppress it. Research has shown monumentally lopsided coverage of gun issues, including USA Today's, which in one year printed 5,660 words on gun crime, and none on the good side of guns. Guns prevent at least 700,000 and as many as 2.5 million crimes every year. The First-Responders Report™ comes out again later this month.

USA Today deserves praise for running the advertorial, when until now, such content was virtually unseen in mainstream outlets. It suggests there is hope for change in the gridlock that sometimes plagues the important issue of gun ownership and use. Contact Bloomfield Press for a voice of reason in the gun debate.

In each published case in the new column there is a victorious armed first responder and authorities are clearly second responders. Officials show up later to take notes, figure out what happened, tape off the area, manage the crowd of media and onlookers, speak on camera, stand around and be videographed for replays, debrief and assist the heroic crime survivor, and sometimes even catch the perpetrator, or call for the coroner's office.

The stories tell what happened to the first responder during the event itself. Each one is linked to a local newscast of the aftermath of the event at Other sources are used in assembling The First-Responders Report TM.

Page Nine by Alan Korwin of Bloomfield Press (“We publish the gun laws”).